Sunday, April 22, 2012

Felipe "Phillip" Rodriguez, A "Forgotten" Cuban Confederate Soldier, from Alabama // Felipe "Phillip” Rodríguez, un soldado Confederado Cubano, de Alabama.

Felipe "Phillip" Rodriguez was a Corporal in Company E, 8th Alabama Infantry (born 1821, Cuba). He enlisted on May 6th, 1861 and is listed as “Single” and a “Laborer”, on his enlistment papers. He fought at the following Battles: Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Gaines Mill, Fraziers Farm, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredricksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg (where he was severely wounded on July 2nd, 1863). He then rejoined his Unit and fought at Bristol, Wilderness, Bradshaws Farm, Spottsylvania Court House, Hanover Junction, Tottottopotoney, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, Petersburg (where he was wounded twice on June 23rd, 1864 and again on June 29th, 1864. He finally surrendered on April 9th, 1865 with the Army of Northern Virginia. The few men who surrendered at Appomattox took the Regimental Battle Flag and instead of surrendering it, tore it into little pieces, with each man getting a sliver of it, as a momento, of their brave service.
Felipe Rodriguez was married twice after the War, once to Mary A. (no surname found, born 1832, in Alabama) and also to Eliza (born 1836, Scotland, no surname found). He was a Cigar Maker and lived at 86 South Cedar Street, in 1861, in Mobile, Alabama. His burial place is unknown.

You can visit http://adf.ly/8ALVr and learn about the Cuba Libre Camp Project of the Admiral Semmes Camp 11, Sons of Confederate Veterans which is a project to identify all known Cuban Confederate Soldiers, as well as other Hispanics and Minorities who served in the Confederate Military.

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Felipe "Phillip" Rodríguez fue un cabo de la Compañía E, 8ª Infantería de Alabama (nacido en 1821, Cuba). Se alistó en el ejército el 6 de mayo de 1861 y está catalogado como "obrero soltero" en sus documentos de alistamiento. Luchó en las batallas siguientes: Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven Pines, Gaines Mill, 2nd Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg (donde fue gravemente herido el 2 de julio de 1863). Después, se reunió con su unidad y luchó en Bristol, Wilderness, Bradshaws Farm, Spottsylvania Court House, Hanover Junction, Tottottopotoney, Cold Harbor, White Oak Swamp, Petersburg (donde fue herido dos veces el 23 de junio de 1864, y de nuevo el 29 de junio 1864). Finalmente se rindió el 09 de abril 1865 con el Ejército de Virginia del Norte. Los pocos hombres que se rindieron en Appomattox tomaron la bandera de batalla del regimiento y en lugar de entregarla, la rompieron en pequeños pedazos, con cada uno recibiendo una astilla de ella, como un recuerdo de su valiente servicio.
Felipe Rodríguez se casó dos veces después de la guerra, una vez con María A. (sin apellido encontrado, nacida 1832, en Alabama) y también con Eliza (nacida en 1836, Escocia, no figura apellido encontrado). Él era un fabricante de cigarros y vivía en la calle 86 South Cedar Street, en 1861, en ​​Mobile, Alabama. El lugar de su sepultura es desconocido.

Friday, April 20, 2012

St. Augustine, Florida Founded, 1565.

St. Augustine, Florida was founded by the Spanish, in 1565. It is the oldest continually occupied City, in the United States.

Jamestown, Virginia Founded, 1607.

Jamestown, Virginia was founded on May 24th, 1607 (May 14th, 1607, Old Calender). It was the first successful British Colony, in what became the United States.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Cuban Confederates, Cuba Libre Camp Project, Sons of Confederate Veterans, Admiral Raphael Semmes Camp 11

Welcome to the Sons of Confederate Veterans, Admiral Raphael Semmes Camp 11, Cuba Libre Camp Project Donation Page. The Sons of Confederate Veterans is a Non-Racial, Non-Political, Non-Sectarian, Historical, Patriotic and Genealogical Organization, Founded in 1896. We welcome all men who are descendants (Lineal or Collateral) of men who served in the Confederate Military. The Admiral Raphael Semmes Camp 11, located in Mobile, Alabama has set up a "Cuba Libre Camp Project" to help preserve the History and Genealogy of Cubans and other Minorities who served in the Confederate Military or those who assisted the Confederate War Effort. This History has been ignored and forgotten and we hope that this project will help preserve it for future generations, both in the United States and in a Free Cuba. We would also like to preserve the History and Genealogy of other Ethnic Groups who served in the Confederate Military. These include the African -American Confederates and "Free Creoles of Color", as well as other Hispanic Confederates, including Spaniards (Basques, Catalans, Canary Islanders and Minorcans), as well as Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Sephardic Jews, who served. There were approx. 7000 Hispanics (approx, 9000-12,000 if you include the "daughtered out" names) who served in the Confederate Military, of which over 400 were Officer's. The known Cuban Confederate contribution was approx. 80 confirmed men and 4 women but there are many more who have yet to be confirmed. The majority of the Cuban Confederates had settled along the Gulf Coast States of Alabama, Louisiana and Florida prior to the War. They mostly came from Havana, Cuba and the surrounding area, although a few were from other parts of Cuba. The small Cuban Community in New Orleans, Louisiana was even able to form a Confederate Militia Company known as "The Cuban Rifles" early in the War and many of its members served in other Confederate Units between 1861 and 1865. // The goal of the Cuba Libre Camp Project is to identify every single Cuban Confederate and to preserve their Military Records, History, Genealogy and any known Photographs and then to do the same for other Ethnic Minorities, who served in the Confederate Military. We hope to be able to preserve a part of American, Confederate and Cuban History, as well as that of other Minority Groups for future generations. We set a project goal of $50,000, this is a "Long Term Goal" and we will immediately begin this project with whatever Donations we recieve, even if it means researching One Soldier at a time, "Rome wasn't built in a day" and neither will this project be completed overnight. Remember, if we don't preserve OUR History, who will ? Please Donate to the Cuba Libre Camp Project of the Admiral Raphael Semmes Camp 11, Sons of Confederate Veterans, any Donation amount is welcome, please take a second and Donate today. Remember every penny counts and gets us closer to our long term goal.
You can click here to Donate >  http://adf.ly/8ALVr
 If you are a Descendant of a Cuban, Hispanic or other Minority which served in the Confederate Military and want some more information on Minorities in the Confederacy or if want to join the Sons of Confederate Veterans, please contact me at JoinTheSCV@Aol.Com . Thank You // Gracias !

Sunday, April 8, 2012

Charles Le Baron, Mexican Consul in Mobile, Alabama 1861-1865 // Charles Le Baron, Consul Mexicano en Mobile, Alabama 1861-1865.

Charles Le Baron served as the Mexican consul, in Mobile, Ala. between 1861-1865, who although not of Hispanic descent was a firm supporter of the Confederacy and used his position as Mexican Consul to assist both the  State and Confederate Governments. He was born in 1803, in Louisiana, and was self-employed at Le Baron and Son Commercial Merchants, located at 14 South Commerce and lived at the north side of Dauphin and west Broad Streets, in 1861, in Mobile, Ala. He was one of the few non-Hispanic founding members of the Spanish Benevolent and Mutual Aid Society, of Mobile in 1871. The Mexican consulate was located on the 2nd floor of 14th South Commerce Street.
Charles Le Baron was married to Ann McVoy (born 1803, Florida, daughter of William “Guillermo” McVoy and Margaret Byrne) and had two sons who served in the Confederate Military. They were Richard Le Baron (born 1840) who served as a Private in Company A, 3rd Alabama Infantry and Alexander Le Baron (born 1843) who served as a Private in the same Company and Unit and later served with Company K, 21st Alabama Infantry.

You can visit http://adf.ly/8ALVr and learn about the Cuba Libre Camp Project of the Admiral Semmes Camp 11, Sons of Confederate Veterans which is a project to identify all known Cuban Confederate Soldiers, as well as other Hispanics and Minorities who served in the Confederate Military.

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Charles LeBaron sirvió como Cónsul Mexicano, en la ciudad de Mobile, Alabama, entre los años de 1861-1865, y a pesar de no ser de descendencia hispánica era un firme partidario de la conferación y usó su posición como Cónsul Mexicano para ayudar a los gobiernos del estado y la confederación. Mr. LeBaron nació en 1803 en la ciudad de Louisiana y trabajó independiente para las firmas Le Baron y Son Commercial Merchants, ubicados en el 14 de la Calle Comercio Sur y vivió al norte de Dauphin y al oeste de la calle Broad, en 1861, en Mobile, Alabama. Fué uno de los pocos socios fundadores, no Hispanos de La Spanish Benevolent y Mutual Aid Society, de Mobile en 1871. El consulado Mexicano estaba ubicado en el segundo piso de su centro de trabajo.
Charles Le Baron se caso con la Srta Ann McVoy (nacida en 1803, en Florida, hija de William "Guillermo" McVoy y Margaret Byrne) y posteriormente tuvieeron dos hijos quienes años mas tarde tambien sirvieron en el ejercito confederado, ellos furon, Richard LeBaron (nacido en 1840) sirvió como Soldado raso en Compañia A, de la Tercera Alabama Infantry y Alexander LeBaron (nacido en 1843) sirvió como Soldado raso en la misma compañia y después paso a ser parte de la Compañia K, de la 21st Alabama Infantry.